LIST OF DENOMINATIONS
NameNotes
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Greek OrthodoxMagnifying glass image
The Redeemed Christian Church of GodMagnifying glass image
BudhistMagnifying glass image
City MissionMagnifying glass image
Wesleyan Holiness ChurchMagnifying glass image
Voice of GodMagnifying glass image
ValmikiMagnifying glass image
Byelorussion Orthodox ChurchMagnifying glass image
AnabaptistA member of a radical movement of the 16th-century Reformation that viewed baptism solely as an external witness to a believer's conscious profession of faith, rejected infant baptism, and believed in the separation of church from state, in the shunning of nonbelievers, and in simplicity of life.Magnifying glass image
JainismAncient Indian religion.Magnifying glass image
Assemblies of GodAs a result of the outpouring of the Holy Spirit at the turn of the 20th century, thousands of Christians were impacted by the power of God’s Spirit and the Pentecostal Church was ignited. A number of Pentecostal networks were established between 1912 and 1920.
In Birmingham in 1924 the British Assemblies of God came into being. From those early days, leaders and churches worked for the expansion of the Kingdom of God.
Our early leaders gave the wider Church much of its teaching on Pentecostal doctrine through writing books and travelling. Donald Gee and Howard Carter were two who travelled the world to tell people about the new understanding of the Holy Spirit’s activity in the Church.
The Movement grew and many different departments were added to its ministry, reflecting our desire to plant churches and assist the growth of our people in the things of God. Today Assemblies of God has over 1,000 leaders and more than 600 churches with many specialised departments ministering at home and abroad, making us one of the largest Pentecostal denominations in our country.
Source AOG web site
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BaptistBaptist churches are often regarded as an Evangelical Protestant denomination. Baptists emphasize a believer's baptism by full immersion, which is performed after a profession of faith in Jesus as Lord and Saviour. A congregational governance system gives autonomy to individual local Baptist churches, which are sometimes associated in organizations such as the General Association of Regular Baptist Churches or the Southern Baptist Convention. In the late 1990s, there were about 43 million Baptists worldwide, 33 million of them living in the United States.
Other large populations of Baptists exist in Africa, especially in Nigeria (called the Nigerian Baptist Convention), in Ghana (called the Ghana Baptist Convention), and in Sierra Leone (called the Sierra Leone Baptist Convention).
The Baptist Union of Great Britain is a focus for British Congregations.
In the UK, in fact, two streams of Baptist life based on two theological understandings of the death of Christ. General Baptists believed Christ died for everyone in general; the Particular Baptists (who emerged in the 1630s), believed he died for an elected few. The two groups ran in parallel, but in 1813 a General Meeting of the Particular Baptist Denomination was established. In 1832 it set aside the foundational Calvinist 1689 confession of faith and the New Connection of General Baptists joined with them – forming the Baptist Union. The more extreme Calvinists left to form the Strict and Particular Baptists.
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RavidassiaBreakaway from Sikhism.Magnifying glass image
Christian ScienceChristian Science, as discovered by Mary Baker Eddy, refers to the universal, practical system of spiritual, prayer-based healing, available and accessible to everyone.Magnifying glass image
MormonChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.
Mormon is the name of the prophet in The Book of Mormon after whom the book is named. According to the book's title page and the account of Joseph Smith, Jr. (who claimed to be the book's translator), Mormon was the prophet-historian who engraved the book on Golden Plates. Most Latter Day Saints believe that Mormon was an actual Nephite prophet who lived in the Americas circa 400 AD. Non-Mormon scholars, as well as some churches that follow the Latter Day Saint movement, particularly within the Community of Christ, consider Mormon to be a fictional character.
The Book of Mormon reports that Mormon was instructed by the prophet Ammaron where to find the records that had been passed down from their ancestors. It also claims that Mormon later abridged the near-millennium-long history of his ancestors, a more ancient people, and additional revelations into the Book of Mormon. The divisions of Mormon attributed to the prophet are the Words of Mormon and the first seven chapters of the larger book. Mormon eventually passed all of the records on to his son Moroni.
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CongregationalCongregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs.Magnifying glass image

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