LIST OF DENOMINATIONS
NameNotes
Page 2 of 5, (16 rows per page; 71 rows available)
First Previous

Next Last
Church of the NazareneMagnifying glass image
Churches of ChristMagnifying glass image
Churches of GodMagnifying glass image
City MissionMagnifying glass image
CokelersThe founder, John Sirgood was born at Averring, Gloucestershire, in 1821. The nickname 'Cokeler' is of very early date, and is popularly attributed to Sirgood's preference for cocoa rather than beer.Most aspects of Dependent belief are fairly orthodox within the Arminian traditions of Protestant dissent. They believed firmly in the people's ability to exercise free will and thereby achieve salvation. Thus, in the nineteenth century, they were closer to Primitive Meth­odism for example, than to Congregationalism which was still strongly Calvinistic in its belief in predestination. Like Quakers though, Dependents were and are avowed pacifists and were conscientious objectors during two world wars. Notes from the web site quoted Magnifying glass image
CongregationalCongregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs.Magnifying glass image
Cook Islands Christian ChurchEssentially Congregational. Historians also claim to detect some elements of Methodist, Anglican and Baptist practice.Magnifying glass image
Coptic OrthodoxMagnifying glass image
Countess of HuntingdonSelina, Countess of Huntingdon, was born in 1707, married in 1728 and became a Christian at around the age of 32. She became a widow seven years later and began to devote her energies wholeheartedly to her ministry. She opened private chapels attached to her houses, but they became contentious and she left the Church of England in 1781.Magnifying glass image
EpiscopalMagnifying glass image
EvangelicalMagnifying glass image
Free Church of EnglandMagnifying glass image
Greek OrthodoxMagnifying glass image
HinduMagnifying glass image
HolinessThe Holiness movement originated in the first half of the 19th century in the United States as a renewal movement within American Methodism but soon became trans-denominational, and by the third quarter of the century was also international. It sought to recover the emphasis of John Wesley on the perfection of love in the lives of believers.Magnifying glass image
IndependentMagnifying glass image

The advertisements below are served by Google; the very small revenue generated when people click on them sometimes covers the cost of hosting the Sussex OPC website.