LIST OF DENOMINATIONS
NameNotes
Page 1 of 4, (16 rows per page; 64 rows available)
First Previous

Next Last
Unknown denominationThis category is used when the demomination of a church or chapel is not known.Magnifying glass image
United ReformedIncludes CongregationalMagnifying glass image
UnitarianHistoric Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). Historic Unitarians believed in the moral authority, but not the deity, of Jesus. Unitarians are characterized by some as being identified through history as free thinkers and dissenters, evolving their beliefs in the direction of rationalism and humanism.
Throughout the world, many Unitarian congregations and associations belong to the International Council of Unitarians and Universalists. Today, most Unitarian Universalists do not consider themselves Christians, even if they share some beliefs quite similar to those of mainstream Christians
Magnifying glass image
The Redeemed Christian Church of GodMagnifying glass image
The Church of GodFormed from the Open Brethren, 1892-4.Magnifying glass image
SwedenborgianMagnifying glass image
SubudMagnifying glass image
SpiritualistMagnifying glass image
Society of St Pius X CatholicMagnifying glass image
SikhMagnifying glass image
Shekinah Global MinistriesMagnifying glass image
ShakerMagnifying glass image
Seventh Day AdventistSeventh-day Adventists are also called Adventists and SDAs. The origin of the Seventh-day Adventists can be traced to the Millerite Movement of the 19th Century. This movement was largely responsible for what has been called the Great second advent awakening. William Miller (1782-1849) was a farmer who settled in upstate New York after the war of 1812. He was originally a Deist (a person who believes that God created the universe but has not been actively involved since). After two years of private Bible study, Miller converted to Christianity and became a Baptist lay leader. He was convinced that the Bible contained coded information about the end of the world and the Second Coming of Jesus. He also realized that he had an obligation to teach his findings to others. In 1831, he started to preach. In 1833, he published a pamphlet on end-time prophecy. In 1836, his book Evidences from Scripture and History of the Second Coming of Christ about the Year 1843 was published. After one of his key prophecies failed to materialize, Miller withdrew from the leadership of his group of followers (who called themselves Adventists) and died in 1849. Ellen Harmon, who married James White, became members of a small group in Washington, New Hampshire, who organised themselves into the first Seventh-day Adventist Church in 1863.Magnifying glass image
Salvation ArmyThe Salvation Army is a protestant evangelical Christian denomination founded in 1865 by Methodist ministers William Booth and Catherine Booth. It is mainly known today for its charity and social work, often among the poorest and most needy of people.
A great site to find out more : http://sawiki.net/
Magnifying glass image
Roman CatholicThe Roman Catholic Church (commonly known as the Catholic Church) is the Christian Church which is led by the Pope, the Bishop of Rome.
The Roman Catholic Church teaches that it is the "one holy catholic and apostolic Church founded by Jesus Christ."
The Holy See of Rome is seen as central, and its bishop, the Pope, is considered to be the (sole) successor of Saint Peter, the chief of the Apostles, sometimes called the "prince" (from Latin princeps, meaning "foremost", "leader") of the Apostles
Magnifying glass image
QuakerThe Religious Society of Friends (commonly known as Quakers or Friends) was founded in England in the 17th century by people who were dissatisfied with the existing denominations and sects of Christianity. Traditionally George Fox has been credited as the founder or the most important early figure. The Society of Friends is counted among the historic peace churches. Since its beginnings in England, Quakerism has spread to other countries, chiefly Kenya, the United States, and Bolivia. The number of Quakers in the world is relatively small (approximately 600,000), although there are places, such as Pennsylvania, particularly Philadelphia, in which Quaker influence is concentrated.Magnifying glass image

The advertisements below are served by Google; the very small revenue generated when people click on them sometimes covers the cost of hosting the Sussex OPC website.