LIST OF DENOMINATIONS
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AnglicanThe term Anglican (from Anglia, the Latin name for England) describes the people and churches that follow the religious traditions developed by the established Church of England. The Anglican Communion codifies the Anglican relationship to the Church of England as a theologically broad and often diverging community of churches, which holds the English church as its mother institution. Adherents of Anglicanism within the Anglican Communion (that is in communion with the See of Canterbury) worldwide number around 70 million but there are numerous denominations which consider themselves Anglican but which are out of the Communion.Magnifying glass image
BaptistBaptist churches are often regarded as an Evangelical Protestant denomination. Baptists emphasize a believer's baptism by full immersion, which is performed after a profession of faith in Jesus as Lord and Saviour. A congregational governance system gives autonomy to individual local Baptist churches, which are sometimes associated in organizations such as the General Association of Regular Baptist Churches or the Southern Baptist Convention. In the late 1990s, there were about 43 million Baptists worldwide, 33 million of them living in the United States.
Other large populations of Baptists exist in Africa, especially in Nigeria (called the Nigerian Baptist Convention), in Ghana (called the Ghana Baptist Convention), and in Sierra Leone (called the Sierra Leone Baptist Convention).
The Baptist Union of Great Britain is a focus for British Congregations.
In the UK, in fact, two streams of Baptist life based on two theological understandings of the death of Christ. General Baptists believed Christ died for everyone in general; the Particular Baptists (who emerged in the 1630s), believed he died for an elected few. The two groups ran in parallel, but in 1813 a General Meeting of the Particular Baptist Denomination was established. In 1832 it set aside the foundational Calvinist 1689 confession of faith and the New Connection of General Baptists joined with them – forming the Baptist Union. The more extreme Calvinists left to form the Strict and Particular Baptists.
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MethodistIncludes Primitive Methodist, Wesleyan MethodistMagnifying glass image
United ReformedIncludes CongregationalMagnifying glass image
QuakerThe Religious Society of Friends (commonly known as Quakers or Friends) was founded in England in the 17th century by people who were dissatisfied with the existing denominations and sects of Christianity. Traditionally George Fox has been credited as the founder or the most important early figure. The Society of Friends is counted among the historic peace churches. Since its beginnings in England, Quakerism has spread to other countries, chiefly Kenya, the United States, and Bolivia. The number of Quakers in the world is relatively small (approximately 600,000), although there are places, such as Pennsylvania, particularly Philadelphia, in which Quaker influence is concentrated.Magnifying glass image
Seventh Day AdventistSeventh-day Adventists are also called Adventists and SDAs. The origin of the Seventh-day Adventists can be traced to the Millerite Movement of the 19th Century. This movement was largely responsible for what has been called the Great second advent awakening. William Miller (1782-1849) was a farmer who settled in upstate New York after the war of 1812. He was originally a Deist (a person who believes that God created the universe but has not been actively involved since). After two years of private Bible study, Miller converted to Christianity and became a Baptist lay leader. He was convinced that the Bible contained coded information about the end of the world and the Second Coming of Jesus. He also realized that he had an obligation to teach his findings to others. In 1831, he started to preach. In 1833, he published a pamphlet on end-time prophecy. In 1836, his book Evidences from Scripture and History of the Second Coming of Christ about the Year 1843 was published. After one of his key prophecies failed to materialize, Miller withdrew from the leadership of his group of followers (who called themselves Adventists) and died in 1849. Ellen Harmon, who married James White, became members of a small group in Washington, New Hampshire, who organised themselves into the first Seventh-day Adventist Church in 1863.Magnifying glass image
Roman CatholicThe Roman Catholic Church (commonly known as the Catholic Church) is the Christian Church which is led by the Pope, the Bishop of Rome.
The Roman Catholic Church teaches that it is the "one holy catholic and apostolic Church founded by Jesus Christ."
The Holy See of Rome is seen as central, and its bishop, the Pope, is considered to be the (sole) successor of Saint Peter, the chief of the Apostles, sometimes called the "prince" (from Latin princeps, meaning "foremost", "leader") of the Apostles
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MormonChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.
Mormon is the name of the prophet in The Book of Mormon after whom the book is named. According to the book's title page and the account of Joseph Smith, Jr. (who claimed to be the book's translator), Mormon was the prophet-historian who engraved the book on Golden Plates. Most Latter Day Saints believe that Mormon was an actual Nephite prophet who lived in the Americas circa 400 AD. Non-Mormon scholars, as well as some churches that follow the Latter Day Saint movement, particularly within the Community of Christ, consider Mormon to be a fictional character.
The Book of Mormon reports that Mormon was instructed by the prophet Ammaron where to find the records that had been passed down from their ancestors. It also claims that Mormon later abridged the near-millennium-long history of his ancestors, a more ancient people, and additional revelations into the Book of Mormon. The divisions of Mormon attributed to the prophet are the Words of Mormon and the first seven chapters of the larger book. Mormon eventually passed all of the records on to his son Moroni.
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AnabaptistA member of a radical movement of the 16th-century Reformation that viewed baptism solely as an external witness to a believer's conscious profession of faith, rejected infant baptism, and believed in the separation of church from state, in the shunning of nonbelievers, and in simplicity of life.Magnifying glass image
Christian ScienceChristian Science, as discovered by Mary Baker Eddy, refers to the universal, practical system of spiritual, prayer-based healing, available and accessible to everyone.Magnifying glass image
Elim PentecostalThe Elim Pentecostal Church was founded in 1915 by a Welshman in Monaghan Ireland. George Jeffreys was an outstanding evangelist and church planter. He had a Welsh Congregational background and was strongly influenced by the Welsh Revival of 1904. Magnifying glass image
Unknown denominationThis category is used when the demomination of a church or chapel is not known.Magnifying glass image
Multi-demominationalThe building hosts two or more denominationsMagnifying glass image
Countess of HuntingdonSelina, Countess of Huntingdon, was born in 1707, married in 1728 and became a Christian at around the age of 32. She became a widow seven years later and began to devote her energies wholeheartedly to her ministry. She opened private chapels attached to her houses, but they became contentious and she left the Church of England in 1781.Magnifying glass image
UnitarianHistoric Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). Historic Unitarians believed in the moral authority, but not the deity, of Jesus. Unitarians are characterized by some as being identified through history as free thinkers and dissenters, evolving their beliefs in the direction of rationalism and humanism.
Throughout the world, many Unitarian congregations and associations belong to the International Council of Unitarians and Universalists. Today, most Unitarian Universalists do not consider themselves Christians, even if they share some beliefs quite similar to those of mainstream Christians
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BrethrenThe Brethren are a fundamentalist Protestant Christian Evangelical movement that was founded in Dublin in the late 1820s.Magnifying glass image

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